a very rich widow with a terrible secret

RSS
Sep 2

(Source: buckysdildo)

Sep 1

I wouldn’t tell my nine-year-old self anything! I’ve seen Back to the Future enough to know that you don’t mess with time. Nice try, bro.

- Chris Pratt, responding to “What if you could tell your nine-year-old self, “One day, you’ll be starring in a film based on these comics you love?” - Rolling Stone, Issue 1215. (via captainsassmerica)

Sep 1

clelta:

We were talking about Shakespeare in English class and the tradition of throwing tomatoes when the actors are bad. Well it turns out, back then people thought tomatoes were poisonous, and so people would aim at the actors mouth and try to kILL THEM WHEN THEY WERE BAD AT ACTING OMG

(Source: baradragon)

Sep 1
mallelis:

an actual letter that actual Ayn Rand sent to Cat Fancy magazine in 1966

mallelis:

an actual letter that actual Ayn Rand sent to Cat Fancy magazine in 1966

Sep 1

hannibal against humanity [pt. 1] [pt.2]

Sep 1
tastefullyoffensive:

"I nominate Mona Lisa and the Girl with the Pearl Earring." [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

"I nominate Mona Lisa and the Girl with the Pearl Earring." [via]

Sep 1
allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.
Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.

Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

Sep 1

You’re a carnie and a thief, you’d fit right in.

You’re a carnie and a thief, you’d fit right in.

(Source: robertdjr.com)

(Source: shuaitou)

thefrogman:

[video]

thefrogman:

[video]

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

turianbatman:

Do you expect me to talk?
No, Ms. Bond. I expect you to die!

I like stories with magic powers in them. Either in kingdoms on Earth or on foreign planets. Usually I prefer a girl hero, but not always.

(Source: fassyy)

xshiromorix:

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

… This makes me so happy.

xshiromorix:

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

… This makes me so happy.

cinematicbeings:

favourite films - stage door

without that job and those lines to say an actress is just like any ordinary girl trying not to look as scared as she feels

cindymayweather:

(Source: etoilesdelanuit)